8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ylva Marii with 111,475 notes

arienreign:

i bought this skull for a cosplay and

Source: arienreign

8th September 2014

Photo reblogged from The Larboard Watch with 87 notes

larboardwatch:

"Paysage sous-marin de l’ile Crespo"
Jules Verne, edition Hetzel, 1869-1870

larboardwatch:

"Paysage sous-marin de l’ile Crespo"

Jules Verne, edition Hetzel, 1869-1870

8th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Rachelosaurus. with 86 notes

razzasmazza:

Charity shop bargains!

razzasmazza:

Charity shop bargains!

8th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Spectacular Moments of Wonder with Dr. Monocle with 141 notes

doctormonocle:

Captain Nemo’s Pipe Organ (via Tom Scherman: A Life with the Nautilus)

doctormonocle:

Captain Nemo’s Pipe Organ (via Tom Scherman: A Life with the Nautilus)

8th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Tumblrful World Of Disney with 171 notes

dfilms:

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, 1954

dfilms:

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, 1954

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 245 notes

retro-tetro:

A Captain Nemo appreciation post. These illustrations from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea were drawn by Alphonse de Neuville and Édouard Riou; you can find more here.

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ungoliantschilde with 378 notes

ungoliantschilde:

Mark Schultz in black and white. There is more of this art to be seen on http://brudesworld.tumblr.com's blog.

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from 70s Sci-Fi Art with 654 notes

70sscifiart:

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

Related note: Just passed 20,000 followers!

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Raiders of the Lost Tumblr with 1,078 notes

gameraboy:

The real star of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, the giant squid! This was the first massive animatronic the Disney company worked with, and led directly to the large dinosaurs for the 1964 New York World’s Fair. More vintage Disney.

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from V Magazine with 18,097 notes

vmagazine:

20 Disney’s Atlantis Facts (You may or may not know)

  1. After Hunchback of Notre Dame was released, Disney decided they didn’t want to do another musical.  Instead, they chose to do an Action-Adventure film inspired by the works of Jules Verne.
  2. The weaponry used is correct to the time period of early 20th century.  The film features the Lee Enflied, the Lewis Gun, the Broomhandle Mauser and a variant of the Luger.
  3. The creation of the Atlantean language was done by the same man who developed the Klingon language for the Star Trek films.
  4. The filmmakers became interested in the readings of  Edgar Cayce and decided to incorporate some of his ideas. (Edgar Cayce is an American psychic who allegedly possessed the ability to answer questions on subjects as varied as healing, reincarnation, wars, Atlantis and future events while in a trance.)
  5. Vinnie’s last name “Santorini” is actually the name of an ancient chain of volcanic islands in the Mediterranean (probably explains his obsession with explosives).
  6. They utilized all three Disney Animation studies, employing 250 animators, artist and technicians.
  7. The Crew actually traveled 800 feet underground in New Mexico’s Carlsbad Cavern to view subterranean trails, which they used as the base model for the movie.
  8. A Japanese anime film “Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water” and “Atlantis: The Lost Empire” were both inspired by the novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea”.
  9. American comic book artist Mike Mignola creator of the series Hellboy worked on the film.
  10. Joss Whedon was the first writer involved with the film.  Whedon is bet known as the creator of the television series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and also directed Marvel’s The Avengers.
  11. Because the movie was planned as an Action-Adventure, the production crew made up t-shirts that read, “ATLANTIS” - fewer songs, more explosions.
  12. The final scene was created by combining many 24 inch (61cm) pieces of paper.  Each piece was carefully drawn and combined with animated vehicles flying across the scene.  The entire piece reaches an equivalent of an 18,000 inch (457.2 m)  piece of paper that the camera slowly pulled away from.

Read the full article via pbpills

'Atlantis: The Lost Empire' & 'Atlantis: Milo's Return are currently streaming on Netflix / pictures©Disney

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